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Nisbet Tartan

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Motto: I Byd It (I endure)

The surname Nisbet is derived from the barony and lands near Edrom in Berwickshire.  The lands are likely to have been named after a geographical feature such as a nose-shaped hill or bend.  In clan circles the name is best known through the work of Alexander Nisbet (1657-1725), who was one of the greatest authorities on Scottish heraldry.  Alexander Nisbet established his connection to the chiefly line of the clan and he is regarded as authoritative on the pedigree of the family.  He stated that the lands of Nesbit, during the reign of King Edgar, son of Malcolm Canmore, were donated to the monks of Dunfermline to pray for the soul of his father. 

A William de Nesbite appears as a witness to a charter by Patrick, Earl of Dunbar in c.1160.  From 1219-1240 Thomas Nisbet was Prior of Coldingham.  In 1296 Philip de Nesbit appears on the Ragman Rolls submitting to Edward I.  Also appearing on the rolls are James, John and Adam Nisbet.  It is likely that Adam was the Nisbet who received a charter for the land of Knocklies from Robert the Bruce.  They were involved in defending the Scottish Borders in the service of David II.  

Their descendant, Alexander, was a royalist devoted to Charles I.  Alexander Nesbit was appointed sheriff of Berwickshire, later joining the King’s standard at Oxford.  Nesbit’s eldest son Philip was abroad when the civil war broke out but was knighted on his return and given command of a regiment.  He was lieutenant governor of Newark-on-Trent during the Siege of Newark.  On leaving Newark, he became an officer for James Graham, first Marquis of Montrose.  

Philip was captured at the Battle of Philiphaugh and executed in Glasgow on 28 October 1646.  Two of his brothers were also killed during the Scottish Civil Wars.  

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