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MacAuley Tartan

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Motto: Dulce periculum (Danger is sweet)

The name MacAulay is common in both Ireland and Scotland.  Two possible derivations exist: both Amhalghaidh (an Irish personal name) and Amhlaibh (a Gaelicisation of the Norse name Olafr), with the prefix ‘mac’, are commonly pronounced MacAulay.  In Scotland these two origins appear split nicely into those of Dunbartonshire, who are said to be of Irish stock, and the Hebridean MacAulays, who trace their descent from Olafr ‘the Black’, brother of Magnus, the last King of Mann and the Isles who lived during the early 12th century.  

The MacAulays of Ardencaple (Dunbartonshire) claim to be of the Siol Alpin and were followers of the MacGregors who claim to be the senior branch of the Clan Alpin.  Others suggest the descent from the old Earls of Levenaux, specifically, from a younger son of the second Alwyn, Earl of Lennox (Levenaux).  

The family was styled Ardincaple and Alexander de Ardincaple who lived during the reign of James V and was the first to adopt the name MacAuley. There has always been a strong link between the Ardencaple MacAulays and the Clan Gregor; in 1591 the Chief signed a Bond of Manrent which acknowledged the Clan as a cadet of the MacGregors.  The line ended in 1767 when the lands of Ardencaple were sold to the Duke of Argyll.  

The Hebridean MacAuleys held Uig in the South of the Isle of Lewis where they were followers of the MacLeods and bitter enemies of the Morrisons.  This small clan were not related by blood or etymology to the MacAuleys of Clan Alpin.  

Although little has been written of them, the Lewis MacAulays appear to have fared better than their southern namesakes, among their number were Lord MacAuley the historian, clergymen and a general in the East India Company.

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